Cinema, couture and classic casting: contagious combination

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We had the pleasure of watching The Dressmaker this week – and at the risk of sounding like Margaret and David I’d have to rate it 5 stars. It’s one of those movies that everyone can take something away from. Kate Winslet plays a character who is striking, real, and a bad girl come heroine with a little bit of mystery. Her performance along with a cast of Aussie greats makes for an incredibly moving film which keeps you stuck to your seat.

Movies like this have a cast of helpers behind them. Hours of direction, writing and costume production go into making them fabulous. On the other hand, short videos that flood the internet are often just moments captured on film. Some only ever seen by a few, others go viral.

Check out this video from The Ellen Show featuring eight-year-old Britton Walker who knows everything there is to know about James Bond, and helps Ellen out by educating her. And then by interviewing Daniel Craig on the red carpet. C = cute.

There is no secret recipe for the perfect viral video, and yet there are videos that receive millions of views every year. What’s the common thread? Generally if you throw a cat, a kid and a piano in you’ve got a good c = combo.

Remember that night watching Susan Boyle’s first performance on X-Factor. No, nor do we. Because we all watched it courtesy of YouTube. So why was her video contagious… ?

Just this week, following the #parisattacks social media erupted in support of Waleed Aly’s condemnation of the Islamic State as ‘weak’. Responding to the deadly attacks in Paris, The Project co-host and GQ ‘Media Personality of the Year’ urged viewers to pull together, and not to play into the hands of the terrorists.

Elon University conducted a study into what makes a video go viral. Here is a quick summary of what their extensive research revealed:

8 Common Characteristics of Viral Videos

A few factors were determined to be the most prevalent (and therefore most important for creating a viral video):

  • Title length: 75% of the videos had short titles (3 words or less), with the average title length being 2.76 words.
  • Run-time:60% of the videos had short run-times (3 minutes or less), with an average run-time of 2 minutes and 47 seconds.
  • Element of laughter: 30% of the videos featured the element of laughter (defined as seeing or hearing someone laughing within the first 30 seconds of the video).
  • Element of surprise:50% of the videos exhibited the element of surprise (defined as seeing or hearing an expression of surprise, such as a scream or gasp).
  • Element of irony: 90% of the videos featured an element of irony (defined as an element contrary to what was expected). The majority of ironic elements in the videos displayed the breaking of social norms.
  • Musical quality: 60% of the videos displayed a musical element (defined as singing, background music, or popular song references).
  • Youth: 35% of the videos featured children seemingly under the age of 18. 20% of them displayed children seemingly under the age of 10.
  • Talent: 30% of the videos were composed of songs, dances, or performances that required practice and talent.

http://www.elon.edu/docs/e-web/academics/communications/research/vol2no1/08West.pdf

Perhaps we’ll share some old home movies and see if they go viral?

Cheers, Jack and the c word crew

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